Plenary Panels

PLENARY SPEAKERS

esther

Dr. Esther Care is a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution, where she leads large scale projects, which explore how education is equipping the next generation of learners with the 21st century skills that our world demands. Also a Professor at the University of Melbourne, Esther is Director of the Assessment Curriculum and Technology Research Centre (funded by the Australian Government’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, in the Philippines), which conducts large and small-scale research in the Philippines to inform that country’s major K-12 education reform. With the increasing focus globally on the promotion of generic skills, such as problem solving, critical thinking and collaboration, Esther’s research has focussed on how to assess, teach, and incorporate these skills into the educational process. Currently leading the Optimizing Assessment for All project at Brookings, Esther is concerned to identify how formal education systems can adapt to the changing learning goals for students. Professor Care publishes widely in academic journals which focus on assessment and educational measurement, and her third volume on Assessment and Teaching of 21st Century Skills was published by Springer early in 2018.

Click here to read some of her publications: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9998-9266

Visit the links below to learn more about Esther:


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Brian Charest

Brian Charest is an assistant professor at the University of Redlands in Southern California. He is a former public high school teacher who has taught in both Chicago and Seattle. He’s worked in a variety of educational settings with students of diverse backgrounds and identities.
Brian earned his doctorate in English Education at the University of Illinois at Chicago, where he taught community-engaged writing, academic writing, English methods, education foundations, and American literature.
Brian also worked at DePaul University in Chicago, where he taught courses for aspiring teachers, including writing across the curriculum, teaching in urban schools, teaching literature, and teaching and reading young adult literature.
Most of Brian’s university teaching has involved community-based work of some kind, where students in his courses worked closely with local community-based organizations, schools, practicing teachers, and residents in “real world” settings. Brian draws on the traditions of community organizers and activist to help teachers learn the skills and strategies to be strong advocates for themselves, their students, and the communities in which they live and work.
Before moving into higher education, Brian taught in the Chicago Public Schools (CPS), teaching at a high school on the far South Side of the city, where he worked with community organizers and community-based organizations on a variety of civic-engagement projects.
Brian is an advocate for publicly funded education and supports efforts to empower marginalized groups and disrupt structural inequalities. He has presented locally and nationally and published articles on teaching, ecological schooling, civic engagement, community organizing, social justice, ethics, and radical pragmatism.

Visit the links below to learn more about Brian:


Hsiao-Lan Sharon Chen
Hsiao-Lan Sharon Chen

Hsiao-Lan Sharon Chen is a Professor at the Department of Education National Taiwan Normal University (NTNU) where she teaches Curriculum Theory; Studies of Knowledge and Curriculum; Methodological Issues of Qualitative Research; Emerging Issues of Curriculum and Instruction; and Curriculum Design. She served as the Director of the Graduate Institute of Educational Policy & Administration and the Graduate Institute of Curriculum and Instruction of NTNU from 2013 to 2016. At present, Prof. Chen is the Convener of the Education Discipline of the Project of Research for Instructional Enhancement at Higher Education by Taiwan’s Ministry of Education. She is also an External Examiner for the Faculty of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences, Hong Kong Institute of Education. Prof. Chen has been a visiting scholar at the following academic institutions: Melbourne Graduate School of Education, University of Melbourne, Australia; College of Education and Psychology, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Germany; and College of Education, Stanford University, USA. She has also been a recipient of several awards including the NTNU Distinguished Professor Award, the NSC/MOST Annual Research Award, and the NTNU Outstanding Teacher Award.

Among her most recent publications are:

  • Hwang, H. Y., & Chen, H. L. S. (2018/in revision). Constructing collective memory for (de)colonization: Taiwanese images in history textbooks, 1950-1987. Paedogogica Historica: International Journal of the History Education.
  • Chen, H. L. S., & Yu, P. (2016). Closing achievement gaps and beyond: Teachers’ reactions to the remedial education policy in Taiwan. Asia Pacific Education Review, 17(4), 609-624. (SSCI)
  • Baron, Alex & Chen, Hsiao-Lan Sharon (2012). Looking in a science classroom: exploring possibilities of creative cultural divergence in science teaching and learning. Cultural Study of Science Education, 7, 93-101.
  • Hackling, Mark W., Ramsegar, Jörg & Chen, Hsiao-Lan Sharon (Eds.) (2017). Quality Teaching in Primary Science Education: Cross-cultural Perspectives. Gewerbestrasse, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing.
  • Hackling, Mark W., Chen, Hsiao-Lan Sharon & Romain, Gisela (2017). Social and cultural factors framing the teaching and learning of primary science in Sustralia, Germany and Taiwan. In M. W. Hackling, J. Ramseger & H.L., Chen (Eds.). Quality teaching in primary science education: Cross-cultural perspectives. (pp.19-47). Gewerbestrasse, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing.
  • Chen, Hsiao-Lan Sharon & Russell, Tytler (2017). Inquiry teaching and learning: Forms, approaches, and embedded views. In M. W. Hackling, J. Ramseger & H.L., Chen (Eds.).Quality teaching in primary science education: Cross-cultural perspectives. (pp.93-122). Gewerbestrasse, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing.
  • Chen, Hsiao-Lan Sharon & Hsieh, Pei-tseng Jenny (2017). Implications for cross-cultural comparisons of teaching and learning. In M. W. Hackling, J. Ramseger & H.L., Chen (Eds.).Quality teaching in primary science education: Cross-cultural perspectives. (pp.309-321). Gewerbestrasse, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing.

clarissa david
Clarissa C. David

Clarissa C. David is Professor at the College of Mass Communication, attached to the Graduate Studies Department where she teaches graduate level classes in quantitative research methods, public opinion, and political communication. Dr. David is a graduate of the MA Communication and PhD Communication programs of the Annenberg School of Communication at the University of Pennsylvania.

Professor David’s academic research interests revolve around news media effects, framing, political knowledge, political engagement, political attitudes, and public opinion. In addition, she conducts policy-oriented research and communication strategy consulting in the areas of public education, health, and governance in the Philippines.


Tatsuya Kusakabe
Tatsuya Kusakabe

Tatsuya Kusakabe (Ph.D) is a Deputy Director and Associate Professor of the Center for the Study of International Cooperation in Education, Hiroshima University. He obtained his Ph.D degree from Kyushu University, Japan. He, then, worked in Kyoto University as a JSPS research fellow and at Waseda University as an Assistant Professor. He inaugurated Associate Professorship at Hiroshima University from 2010. His expertise is on the fields of Comparative Education and Area Studies of South Asia. He also contributes as editor in chief of “Comparative Education Study” which is published by the Japan Comparative Education Society.

 


Jose LalasJose Lalas has been involved in teacher education for 29 years as a faculty in both public and private universities (14 years at CSU Dominguez Hills; currently, 15 years at University of Redlands). Prior to his teacher education experience, Jose has been a junior high school classroom teacher. He has served as an associate dean, director of teacher education, and coordinator of credential program. Currently, he is Professor of Literacy and Teacher Education and directs the University of Redlands’ Center for Educational Justice. He co-authored four published books: A Teaching and Learning Framework for Social Justice (2006), Instructional Adaptation as an Equity Solution for English Learners and Special Needs Students (2007), Who We Are and How We Learn: Educational Engagement and Justice for Diverse Learners (2016), and Challenges Associated with Cross-cultural and At-risk Student Engagement (2017). His research agenda includes student engagement, social and educational justice, critical theory, pedagogy, and literacy, adaptation pedagogy, achievement gap, second language acquisition, and mentoring of diverse faculty. His most current research work focuses on student engagement and achievement gap and the influence of social and cultural capital, social class, funds of knowledge, and language in dual language immersion programs. He is also currently an elected school board member of the Corona-Norco Unified School District and has served this district as member of the Board of Education for 22 years (from 1990 to 2003; from 2008 to present). He initiated the institutionalization of collaboration between the District Administration and the two employee associations — CNTA and CSEA — in the 90’s in handling negotiations and finding solutions to immediate problems and challenges. He also introduced the creation of the district’s “think-tank” to study the issue of achievement gap, equity, and to find ways how to address the disparity in achievement among the diverse groups of students.

Visit the links below to read Jose’s works:


maria ordaz
María Ordaz

María Ordaz is currently an elementary school teacher at San Bernardino City Unified School District, a school located in a low socioeconomic area with a high achievement gap between White and Asians on one side and Blacks and Latinos on the other. Maria is an English Language Facilitator, provides professional development on English Language Development, oversees the intervention program at her site, participates in committees for English Learners, and represents all English Language Arts and English Language Development efforts for the district. She works with a small focus group of educators for the State of California on how to implement the new English Language Roadmap curriculum that covers dual language and biliteracy. María Ordaz is a 3rd year doctoral Student at the University of Redlands, with Dr. Lalas as her dissertation chair, and doing research on the connection between teacher’s literacy ideology and student engagement in order to close the achievement gap for long-term English learners.

 


Lea Angela Pradilla
Lea Angela Pradilla

Lea Angela Pradilla is ACTRC’s Research Officer for the projects, Understanding Best Practices in Mother Tongue-Based Multilingual Education (MTB-MLE) in the Philippines and LearnBEST. Her work on the project was focused on the preparation of fieldwork research instruments and data management and analysis using NVivo and SPSS. In addition, Lea is also ACTRC’s Research Coordinator, engaging with researchers across academe and development institutions to facilitate ACTRC research objectives.Lea has been a resource speaker in DepEd workshops and trainings and has presented at several overseas conferences dedicated to issues around MTB-MLE implementation.Through her experience in the conduct of the ACTRC research and dissemination of findings, Lea has established linkage with program implementers and researchers in the Philippines.
Lea earned her Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and Master of Management from the University of the Philippines-Visayas, where she taught for five years. She is currently enrolled in the Doctor of Social Development program of the University of the Philippines-Diliman. Her current research interests are in language-in-education and sustainable development.

Visit the links to her publications below:


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Pam Robertson

Pam Robertson is a Lecturer and Research Fellow at the Assessment Research Centre, University of Melbourne. As part of this role she is also a staff member at the Assessment Curriculum and Technology Research Centre at the University of the Philippines. Pam’s focus is the use of assessment data to inform teaching and learning. She is experienced in the development, validation and evaluation of assessment materials tailored for specific purposes. She also teaches subjects in the areas of assessment. She has been involved in numerous projects involving the development of assessment materials and their alignment to curricula. Pam’s current research projects include a project assessing the progress of students’ skills across four units of Chemistry to inform curriculum implementation in the Philippines and several projects in Australia and the Philippines helping understand and promote better formative assessment practices. Pam has delivered training in Australia, Vietnam, Philippines and Saudi Arabia. Pam Robertson has also been a teacher of mathematics and science and has co-authored multiple physics texts.

Among her published works are:

  • Robertson, P., Pietzner, J., English, N. (2018). Guide to Formative Assessment Rubrics (Draft for trialling and feedback). Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority. http://www.vcaa.vic.edu.au/Pages/foundation10/viccurriculum/formative_assessment.aspx
  • Care, E., Robertson, P., & Ferido, M. (in press) Learning progression models that enhance support of learning at the bottom of the pyramid. UNESCO-IIEP publication
  • Robertson, P., Care, E., & Ferido, M. (May 18, 2018) Identifying student readiness through science learning progressions in the Philippines [blog post]. Retrieved from https://www.brookings.edu/blog/education-plus-development/2018/05/18/identifying-student-readiness-through-science-learning-progressions-in-the-philippines/
  • Griffin, P., Francis, M., & Robertson, P. (2017). Judgement-based assessment. In P. Griffin (Ed.), Assessment for teaching (2nd ed.). Melbourne, Cambridge University Press.
  • Griffin, P., Francis, M., Robertson, P. (2017). Guttman analysis. In P. Griffin (Ed.), Assessment for teaching (2nd ed.). Melbourne, Cambridge University Press.
  • Griffin, P., Care, E., Crigan, J., Robertson, P., Zhang, Z., & Arratia-Martinez, A. (2014). The influence of evidence-based decisions by collaborative teacher teams on student achievement. In S. Billet, C. Harteis, and H. Gruber (Eds.), International Handbook of Research in Professional and Practice-based Learning (pp. 1299-1331). Springer.

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Heidi Strikwerda

Heidi Strikwerda is currently a middle school English Teacher at San Bernardino City Unified School District, a school located in a low socioeconomic area with a high achievement gap between White and Asians on one side and Blacks and Latinos on the other. Heidi is an English Language Facilitator, designs curricular units, creates benchmarks, participates in committees for English Learners, and represents all English Language Arts and English Language Development efforts for the district. She works with a small focus group of educators for the State of California on how to implement the new English Language Roadmap curriculum that covers dual language and biliteracy. Heidi Strikwerda is a 3rd year doctoral Student at the University of Redlands, with Dr. Lalas as her dissertation chair, and doing research on the connection between increasing hope, motivation, and student engagement in order to close the achievement gap for impoverished students.


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Prof. Manabu Sumida

Manabu Sumida is Professor of science education, Faculty of Education, Associate Director of Institute for International Relations at the Ehime University in Japan. He holds a BS in chemistry from Kyushu University and PhD in science education from Hiroshima University. His research area is science education for gifted learners. He was a committee member of the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2003, the TIMSS Video Study, and the OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2006 and 2015. He was a visiting researcher at the University of Georgia in 1998 and visiting scholar at the University of Cambridge in 2012. He has been Director of Kids Academy Science (a special science programme for gifted young children) for 9 years. He received the Best Presentation Award in 2007 and 2008, and the International Contribution Award in 2016 from Japan Society for Science Education. He also received the Ryoji Noyori Eduaction Award in 2013. He is currently the Director of Japan Society for Science Education, and Regional Representative for Asia of the International Council of Association for Science Education.

Among his most recent works are: